Flash Floods – Slot Canyons

Bryce Canyon Country’s slot canyons are evidence of the extraordinary powers of moving water. Powerful flowing rivers, heavy thunderstorms, and spring run-off from snow-covered mountains have all had a hand in chiseling, shaping, and smoothing the narrow sandstone canyons.

Flash floods most easily occur in narrow places such as these slot canyons.

Flash floods, caused by a sudden rush of water filling a narrow space, are also a powerful force in a slot canyon’s formation. During a flash flood,

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Slot Canyon – Little Death Hollow

The Escalante River canyons are abundant in the area surrounding Scenic Byway 12 between Boulder and Escalante. The canyons in this area of Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument vary from narrow and deep to wide open. Some of the most frequently explored canyons of this region include Upper and Lower Calf Creek Falls, Upper and Lower Escalante, and Little Death Hollow.

Slot Canyons are abundant in the Bryce Canyon and Grand Staircase Region

Little Death Hollow is about eight

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Coyote Gulch Slot Canyon – Grand Staircase

Coyote Gulch winds through the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument’s red rock backcountry.   The full length of this popular Escalante River Canyon is about 11.5 miles roundtrip and requires a good deal of stamina—with a pretty spectacular payoff.  Highlights along the way include Stevens Arch and Jacob Hamblin Arch, Coyote Natural Bridge, and Crack-in-the-Rock.

A waterfall in Coyote Gulch Slot Canyon in Utah's Bryce Canyon Country. Click for larger image.

Coyote Gulch is located about 30 miles

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Utah Slot Canyons: Peek-a-boo and Spooky Gulch

Peek-A-Boo and Spooky Gulch Slot Canyons are easily accessible and enjoyable for most ages.

The Escalante River and some of its tributaries wind through the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, creating a maze of intricate canyons just waiting to be explored. While many of the Escalante River slot canyons are accessible from Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and the southern tip of Lake Powell, Hole-in-the-Rock Road offers vehicular access from Escalante to several popular slot canyons in

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Bryce Canyon South End

Bryce Canyon National Park’s 18-mile scenic drive winds north-south through the park, ascending more than 1,000 feet to its highest elevation of 9,115 feet at Rainbow Point. While many visitors concentrate their time on the rim of Bryce Amphitheater, viewpoints offering expansive vistas far beyond the amphitheater await as you head south through the park.

View of the southern end of Bryce Canyon National Park

To reach the southern half of the park, continue south on the scenic road past

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Geology – Bryce Canyon – Grand Staircase

The Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument includes 1.9 million acres of rugged and remote landscape from Escalante to Kanab. The vast monument is divided into three geographically distinct regions consisting of the oldest layers in the southern Grand Staircase section, the central region known as the Kaiparowits Basin, and the northern Escalante Canyons region.

Bryce Canyon Amphitheater

Perhaps most intriguing about Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument is its layered ‘staircase’ effect which reveals a stunning geologic history spanning at least

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Scenic Backroads – Pine Creek – Hell’s Backbone

The combination of Highway 12, Pine Creek Road, and Hell’s Backbone Road create a scenic loop that includes multiple landscapes and points of interest along one driving route, and provides an easy way to see various landmarks in a single day trip.

The loop, which partially traverses areas of the Boulder Mountain, can begin from one of two towns.  The first, Escalante, is a great location to learn more about the area’s history.  In May 2011 the first phase of the Escalante

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Cottonwood Canyon Road

A drive through Cottonwood Canyon is a great way to get up close and personal with Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument’s rugged landscape. Cottonwood Canyon Road winds through Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument for 47 miles, starting near Cannonville at the intersection of Scenic Byway 12 and ending at Scenic Highway 89 near milepost 18.

Cottonwood Canyon in Utah's Bryce Canyon Country

Some people use the road as a scenic “shortcut” between Bryce Canyon National Park and Lake Powell, but

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Lower Calf Creek Falls

Published under Canyoneering,Escalante Utah,Grand Staircase,Hiking on

Calf Creek Falls – Click for larger image.

A walk into the lower Calf Creek Falls is an opportunity for multiple experiences. The trail head is found at the Calf Creek campground just fifteen miles east of the town of Escalante on Scenic Byway 12. The waters of Calf Creek begin on the Boulder Mountains and the creek eventually enters the Escalante River drainage.

The Calf Creek Falls hike is approximately 2.5 miles (each direction) and winds

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The Burr Trail – Boulder, Utah to Bullfrog at Lake Powell

This long and scenic road passes through a mid-section of the Burr Trail

Utah’s Burr Trail road is a 66-mile scenic backway that winds through some of the most untamed areas of Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, Capitol Reef National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.  The Burr Trail Road is easily accessible from Boulder, at the junction with Scenic Byway 12, near the southern tip of Capitol Reef National Park and the base of Boulder Mountain.

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